Funding programs and mobility grants

You are a researcher in a CNRS-affiliated unit and would like to engage in structured and sustained cooperation with your Canadian collaborators? Below you’ll find the different types of tools and funding available to help you get started.

CNRS provides tools to structure its scientific cooperation with Canada. These partnerships facilitate and help fund collaborations between scientists from CNRS-affiliated research units and Canadian scientists. These partnerships differ according to the nature, scope and context of the desired collaboration. For any type of partnership between a Canadian university and the CNRS, the application process must be initiated by CNRS researchers with the international relations officers of their home institute.

CNRS partnerships

CNRS international cooperation is built on 5 types of structuring partnerships:

What is an International Emerging Action (IEA)?

An IEA is a project between scientists whose aim is to explore new areas of research and international partnerships through short-term assignments, the organization of working meetings and the launch of preliminary joint research for shared scientific projects.

Who are IEAs designed for?

IEAs are open to staff working in a CNRS research unit, and to their partners in France and abroad.

How to submit a proposal for an IEA?

Applications must be submitted to the CNRS scientific institute to which the applicant’s unit is attached. Candidates are advised to contact the international relations officers of their unit’s institute as early as possible to find out how to apply. In the case of interdisciplinary projects, the various institutes involved can be informed.

What is an International Research Project (IRP)?

An IRP is a partnership that funds a collaborative research project between French partners and partners from one or two foreign countries who have already demonstrated their ability to work together.

Who are IRPs designed for?

IRPs are designed for staff carrying out research in a CNRS unit, as well as their partners in France and abroad.

How to submit a proposal for an IRP?

Applications must be submitted to the CNRS scientific institute to which the applicant’s unit is attached. Candidates are advised to contact the international relations officers of their unit’s institute as early as possible to find out how to apply. In the case of interdisciplinary projects, the various institutes involved can be informed.

CNRS currently has 12 IRPs in Canada.

What is an International Research Network (IRN)?

An IRN is a partnership that structures an international scientific community around a common research theme or framework. It fosters the organization of international workshops and seminars, as well as thematic schools organized by network partners in France and abroad.

Who are IRNs designed for?

IRNs are designed for staff carrying out research in a CNRS unit, as well as their scientific partners in France and abroad.

How to submit a proposal for an IRN?

Applications must be submitted to the CNRS scientific institute to which the applicant’s unit is attached. Candidates are advised to contact the international relations officers of their unit’s institute as early as possible to find out how to apply.

CNRS currently has 10 IRNs in Canada.

What is an International Research Laboratory (IRL)?

An IRL is an international structure where research work is carried out around a common scientific theme. This partnership establishes, on an identified site located in a foreign country, the significant and lasting presence of scientists from a limited number of research institutions in France and in the partner country.

Who are IRLs designed for?

IRLs are designed for staff carrying out research in a CNRS unit, as well as their scientific partners in France and abroad.

How to submit a proposal for an IRL?

Applications must be submitted to the CNRS scientific institute to which the applicant’s unit is attached. Candidates are advised to contact the international relations officers of their unit’s institute as early as possible to find out how to apply. An IRL is built up over a year, during which time a cooperation agreement is negotiated between the various French and international bodies involved.

CNRS currently has 6 IRLs in Canada.

What is an International Research Center (IRC)?

An IRC is an intangible structure that aims to strengthen and sustain strategic partnerships with an institution of excellence having a high level of cooperation with the CNRS, involving several research units on a variety of themes. These are institutional initiatives that go beyond a small number of laboratories or research teams, as is the case with other CNRS international research partnerships.

What can IRC enable?

An IRC strengthens cooperation between CNRS and its partner by establishing new collaborations to meet jointly decided research objectives. It provides a framework for regular high-level strategic dialogue between the two partner institutions, steered by bilateral institutional bodies to foster synergies. One example of collaboration facilitated by an IRC is the Joint PhD Program, which aims to get two teams – one French, the other international – working on a joint project, and to encourage the mobility of young researchers. PhD Joint Programs provide funding for doctoral scholarships and mobility for 3 years.

How is an IRC built?

The creation of an IRC can only be the outcome of intense cooperation already firmly established between CNRS and the partner university. Setting up such a partnership requires a negotiation process between CNRS and the partner involved.

Other programs

In addition to CNRS partnerships, there are other programs that support Franco-Canadian scientific collaborations:

France Canada Research Fund

The France Canada Research Fund (FCRF) is a major instrument of Franco-Canadian scientific cooperation, created in 2000 by an agreement between the French Embassy in Canada and a consortium of 23 Canadian universities.

In twenty years, the FCRF has funded over 400 collaborative research projects. The FCRF currently has 23 member universities and supports around 20 new projects each year. These projects are conducted by French and Canadian teams collaborating for the first time.

The FCRF is open to all fields of research. Applications are accepted for collaborative projects involving a French institution (university, grande école or research organization) and one of the 23 Canadian universities that are members of the FCRF.

Samuel-De-Champlain Program

The Samuel-De-Champlain Program, funded by the Commission permanente de coopération franco-québécoise (CPCFQ), has two components: a “training” component and a “research” component, open to all themes, while specifying, for part of the call for projects, priority themes in line with the priorities of the Quebec and French governments.

The Fonds de recherche du Québec – Nature et technologies (FRQNT) is mandated by the Quebec Ministry of Education and Higher Education and the Quebec Ministry of International Relations and Francophonie to manage this program, and acts on their behalf. The French Ministry of Europe and Foreign Affairs, represented by the Consulat général de France à Québec, through its cooperation and cultural action department, is the FRQNT’s main contact for the French part of the program.

Mourou-Strickland Mobility Program

The Mourou-Strickland Mobility Program, launched by the French Embassy in Canada in 2018, is a bilateral mobility program designed to foster scientific partnerships between researchers in France and Canada. The program was named in honor of physicists Donna Strickland (University of Waterloo) and Gérard Mourou (École Polytechnique and CNRS), who were awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics for their collaborative work on lasers, and more specifically on “frequency drift amplification”.

Although the program’s title pays tribute to these outstanding physicists, it is open to researchers from all fields. The aim of the program is to encourage collaboration and the exchange of knowledge between French and Canadian scientists, along the lines of the successful partnership exemplified by Strickland and Mourou.

Mitacs Globalink Research Award

The Mitacs Globalink Research Award is a program that supports research collaborations between Canada and certain partner organizations, including the CNRS.

This program gives doctoral and post-doctoral students from CNRS-affiliated units the opportunity to carry out a research project in Canada for a period of between 12 and 24 weeks, under the joint supervision of assigned professors. The financial support allocated to the scholarship holder is 6,000 CAD.

Applications for the Mitacs Globalink Research Award must be made to Mitacs through the local Mitacs representative.

Prepare for your mission in Canada

Are you affiliated with the CNRS and would like to carry out a research mission in Canada?
Below are our recommendations to help you prepare for your stay.

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Get your CNRS mission order

You must have a mission order specific to your trip.

Click here and follow the procedure on the CNRS intranet to obtain your mission order. The “Partir en mission” tab on the CNRS intranet site details the essential steps to take before, during and after your mission.

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Meet administrative requirements

As with any trip outside the EU, make sure you comply with the administrative requirements of your destination, depending on the nature of your stay.

Click here to see the requirements of the Canadian authorities that apply to your situation.

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Keep up to date on the security situation

Canadian nature and weather conditions can put travelers at risk.

Click here to see the latest recommendations from the French Ministry of Europe and Foreign Affairs for travelers to Canada.

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Report your presence in Canada

Make sure you’re kept informed of the security situation in Canada during your stay, and help France ensure your safety in the event of a major crisis.

Click here to register your contact details with the French Ministry of Europe and Foreign Affairs on the Ariane website. For stays of more than six months, French nationals must register with the “Registre des Français établis hors de France”.